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Church of St. Ignatius Loyola on Park Avenue.

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Some U.E.S. Style

I often see this guy walking past Dean & Deluca around 10am.

Strong Hair.

I kind of love these Zuki coats, but wish they weren’t made from real fur.
Photo from zuki.com

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Just a note to say

that whenever I see an Afghan dog on the street (not very often) it reminds me of Sally Kellerman’s character in Back to School which is a nice thing to remember.  It’s not just the hair, it’s the attitude.

Afghan Hound Photo by Mary Bloom

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Just sayin’.

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The Franklin


I recently stayed a few nights at The Franklin Hotel on 87th Street between Lexington Ave and Third Ave.  Been walking by it for years, used to see the bellhop in a top hat.  Haven’t seen that in a long time there was no top hatted bellhop during my stay.  I have a feeling The Franklin has a gritty, story-filled New York City history.  The building was constructed around 1929 and the neon sign looks old and classic.  When I told people I would be staying there, most asked in a disgusted tone, why would I want to stay there?  I guess it doesn’t appear from the outside to be a really “nice” hotel but I was looking for something with a certain old New York vibe.  I almost didn’t stay there because when I sought out more information The Franklin Hotel website painted a picture of a chic contemporary boutique hotel, no mention of any past.  There were mixed reviews on Yelp and I think anyone looking for a contemporary boutique hotel could be disappointed.  The hallways and parts of rooms like the nook for the sink in my bathroom were datedly small.  But for anyone looking for that old New York feeling like myself, The Franklin was everything I wanted it to be.  Perhaps the coolest part is the elevator with an art deco motif in the cab.  The doorsknobs to the elevator on each floor have inlaid mother-of-pearl or abalone bits.  Mosaic room numbers.  I wish the Franklin would market its historical aspects more.  I want to know who stayed there, who died there, and if I knew its stories I swear I would stay there more often.  Anyone know any Franklin stories?  Please add in the comments.  Here are some photos.



The elevation plan is on display in the entrance.

A blurry photo I took several years ago of the bellhop.

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Me in Carnegie Hill News

I’ve already written about this on my personal website and facebook, but it’s actually relevant, so, I’m excited to share that I’ve finally been featured in Carnegie Hill News, the newsletter put out by Carnegie Hill Neighbors.  I’ve been reading it for years and now my time has come!

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You know those benches at “Engineer’s Gate” at 90th Street and Fifth Avenue where you enter the loop and the bridal path and the reservoir?  Check out the detailing UNDER the benches. They really don’t make things like they used to.

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Andrew Alpern gave a talk at the New York Public Library a few weeks ago about the newest edition of his book “Holdouts! The Buildings That Got in the Way.”  He ended with a neutral statement: “Holdouts are neither all good nor all bad. They simply are.”  But it seemed to me that his sentiments leaned toward the negative.

Alpern opened his illustrated presentation with the image of a lonely, two-story building on an otherwise cleared city block, saying, “This is not a holdout.  It is the container of a holdout.”

Holdouts are the people who refuse to sell their property to make way for new developments.  You can see the results of holdouts throughout the city, wherever a tiny building is squished between two towers (one example: 592 Eighth Avenue).

This sort of sight always makes me smile; I think I would like to live in the little building. [click to continue…]

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Odd Couple Buttons

My friend Olivia Kraus pointed out to me that 1049 Park Avenue, the building which inspired my Roped Flower Buttons is also the building where the Odd Couple lived!

Photo by Brandon Perlman

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A Biento

Sent by Ariel Schulman, Shelter Island Ferry:

20120211-145613.jpg

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